BOEKS
  • BOEKS 06:
    Post•Comics
    circling­∞corridoring

    book presentation & opening
    Thursday 22.10.2020, 18:00
    •exhibition
    23.10.2020 - 18.12.2020 


    publicatie

    Post-Comics. Beyond Comics, Illustration
    and The Graphic Novel
    2020
    Concept by Sébastien Conard
    Design by Thomas Desmet and Emma Vanhille
    Published by het balanseer (for sale here) and KASK & Conservatorium
    170 x 240 mm, 124 pages, English, edition: 250

    With texts by Maheen Ahmed on Felipe Muhr, Benoît Crucifix on Ilan Manouach, Charlotte Pylyser on Olivier Deprez, Aarnoud Rommens on Tom Lambeens, Maria Clara Carneiro on Jochen Gerner, Jean-Charles Andrieu de Lévis on Benjamin Monti, Jan Op de Beeck on Sébastien Conard. Foreword by Jan Baetens and introduction by Sébastien Conard.



     


    also on the Post*Comics program
    Thursday 22.10.2020

    •18:00•
    opening 1M3 by Ilan Manouach & Sébastien Conard
    @ KASK, Entrance hall Pauli  
    + opening Post-Comics / Post-Practices exhibition by 
    Chiara Becce, Suzy De Laere, Ieva Liba Ratniece & Adelina Rosseel (bachelors Graphic Design, Printmaking and Illustration)
    @
    Kunstenbibliotheek, Cellarium
    •19:00•
    printing performance by Olivier Deprez & Roby Comblain
    @ BOEKS, Corridor
    •20:00•
    KASKlecture by Tom Lambeens
    @ KASK, Cirque

    Can an art form become what it is not? Can the comic strip or graphic novel, for example, develop into 'something else' in this fluid ‘post-comic’ age?**

    This question nourished the 'post-comics' project that culminated at KASK in a reflective research publication, an exhibition, a project studio with the second and third Bachelor of Graphic Design, lectures and a performance with and by the involved artists. All this can be seen in the BOEKS Corridor, in the 1M3, in the Kunstenbibliotheek and the Cellarium attached to it.

    BOEKS invited Linh Dong to spatially bring together the various oeuvres discussed in the Post-Comics publication in the corridor leading to the library. She unites the signatures of seven artist practices in one custom made installation. Signs stand on their own, like black writing on white walls, carry only a colour here and there, or form fields and ultimately evoke one graphic landscape. 

    Linh Dong (1995, Belgium/Vietnam) graduated as a graphic designer from the KASK & Conservatory in 2018. She has a passion for type, storytelling and printed media.

    Until the end of the year, we'll work on a subject-related online 'slip box' 🗃 — check this page for updates!

    Felipe Muhr, “Blindsight”, 2015

    **In the meantime, while chewing on these hitherto unidentified cultural objects:

    "Post-comics are much more than just another way of making or telling comics. What post-comics are doing is transferring the art of comics to different fields, different contexts, if not different artistic, cultural, technological and industrial worlds. These new environments may challenge postcomics the same way they themselves have challenged their initial comics setting." — from Baeten's foreword Why do we need Post∞Comics

    “Thierry Groensteen called comics a ‘uco’ or an ‘unidentified cultural object’. But even if they are still partly misunderstood, comics and graphic novels are by now culturally well appreciated. Against this background, post-comics appear as the kind of creations that are not easily situated, at least from a conventional comics’ point of view. Since the post-comics presented here mix several genealogies (art, comics, literature, cinema and so on) is it still valid to call them post-comics? Aren’t they just artworks and practices that incorporate comics traditions?” — from Conard’s introduction Post+Comics: A certain point in time

     

     

    Photos: Leontien Allemeersch

    BOEKS 06:
    Post•Comics
    circling­∞corridoring

    book presentation & opening
    Thursday 22.10.2020, 18:00
    •exhibition
    23.10.2020 - 18.12.2020 


    publicatie

    Post-Comics. Beyond Comics, Illustration
    and The Graphic Novel
    2020
    Concept by Sébastien Conard
    Design by Thomas Desmet and Emma Vanhille
    Published by het balanseer (for sale here) and KASK & Conservatorium
    170 x 240 mm, 124 pages, English, edition: 250

    With texts by Maheen Ahmed on Felipe Muhr, Benoît Crucifix on Ilan Manouach, Charlotte Pylyser on Olivier Deprez, Aarnoud Rommens on Tom Lambeens, Maria Clara Carneiro on Jochen Gerner, Jean-Charles Andrieu de Lévis on Benjamin Monti, Jan Op de Beeck on Sébastien Conard. Foreword by Jan Baetens and introduction by Sébastien Conard.



     


    also on the Post*Comics program
    Thursday 22.10.2020

    •18:00•
    opening 1M3 by Ilan Manouach & Sébastien Conard
    @ KASK, Entrance hall Pauli  
    + opening Post-Comics / Post-Practices exhibition by 
    Chiara Becce, Suzy De Laere, Ieva Liba Ratniece & Adelina Rosseel (bachelors Graphic Design, Printmaking and Illustration)
    @
    Kunstenbibliotheek, Cellarium
    •19:00•
    printing performance by Olivier Deprez & Roby Comblain
    @ BOEKS, Corridor
    •20:00•
    KASKlecture by Tom Lambeens
    @ KASK, Cirque

    Can an art form become what it is not? Can the comic strip or graphic novel, for example, develop into 'something else' in this fluid ‘post-comic’ age?**

    This question nourished the 'post-comics' project that culminated at KASK in a reflective research publication, an exhibition, a project studio with the second and third Bachelor of Graphic Design, lectures and a performance with and by the involved artists. All this can be seen in the BOEKS Corridor, in the 1M3, in the Kunstenbibliotheek and the Cellarium attached to it.

    BOEKS invited Linh Dong to spatially bring together the various oeuvres discussed in the Post-Comics publication in the corridor leading to the library. She unites the signatures of seven artist practices in one custom made installation. Signs stand on their own, like black writing on white walls, carry only a colour here and there, or form fields and ultimately evoke one graphic landscape. 

    Linh Dong (1995, Belgium/Vietnam) graduated as a graphic designer from the KASK & Conservatory in 2018. She has a passion for type, storytelling and printed media.

    Until the end of the year, we'll work on a subject-related online 'slip box' 🗃 — check this page for updates!

    Felipe Muhr, “Blindsight”, 2015

    Photos: Leontien Allemeersch

    More ***posts to come


    In the coming weeks, this page will be regularly updated with new index cards of what we could call Post*Comics practices.

    One by one, the cards will slide into a ‘slip box’, meaning a non-linear note-taking system, a ‘fichebak’, ‘kartotek’ or ‘Zettelkasten’ as some other tongues would put it. Sociologist Niklas Luhmann, famous for his extensive use of the index card files, called it his ‘second brain’ or ‘communication partner’: “There can be several places of connection on a slip. In this way, a kind of internal growth (Wachstum nach innen) is made possible, depending on what kind of material for thought occurs” (from Luhmann’s essay Kommunikation mit Zettelkästen. Ein Erfahrungsbericht, 1981). It allows us “to perceive connections and relationships between individual items of information that may not be apparent in isolation” (from Angelika Mittelmann’s book Wissensmanagement wird digital, 2019).

    In the spirit of this working method we’re open to personal text contributions, short pieces of information that are taken down as they are acquired or other notes on post*comics artist practices, specific works and printed matter.

    The progress of this online slip box will determine the shape of the physical box we hope to create and install in Kunstenbibliotheek in collaboration with Maya Strobbe from the artists books’ publishing house Ramsdam Books. On route, Maya will figure out her own material definition of the Zettelkasten & in particular the Post∞Comics one. We hope to present it to you at the beginning of our new year 2021.

    Contact us at boeks@hogent.be!

    Your communication partners,
    Liene & Sébastien

    © Maya Strobbe

    Pauline Barzilaï


    A graduate of HEAR (Strasbourg, FR), Pauline Barzilaï’s work applies drawing and painting to various print documents. Photographs, magazines, books, and comics offer print matter onto which she intervenes in specific ways. The intervention can involve color crayons, gouache, or lithographic printing: whether applied to glossy or pulp paper, each delivers its own kind of opacification or transparency. Barzilaï engages with cheap, second-hand comics found in local contexts. An Iceland translation of Tom & Jerry is overlayered with lithographic gray and turns it into a “dirty comic,” parsing gray spots that redistribute the readers’ gaze while leaving the underlying sequence visible. With Le long sommeil, an uneven black gouache covers the pages of a French pocket Superman title, breaking its gridded layout in abstract washy paints and four-color hues. La dernière guerre, self-published in the midst of the Covid 19 pandemic, applies gouache as camouflage to the pages of an amateur history magazine for WWII fans. The color gouaches smear out faces, warships, explosions, with more or less density and opacity. War is over, but we know it is not.

    Benoît Crucifix
    contributor to the Post-Comics publication

    Alexis Beauclair


    Maximizing in a minimalist and playful way the resources of vectorial drawing and risograph printing, Alexis Beauclair recently evolved from slightly post-surrealist or erotico-absurdist comics and zines like Perle and Sonde (2011) toward more object-like artist’s publication such as Enigma (2017) or Loto (2019). This last booklet, published by the avant-gardist comics editor Matière, looks like a hybrid between the by now well-established genre of abstract comics and clean designer books. If telling anything but the adventures of the little balls known from the famous ‘lotto’ chance game, one can also absorb Loto as the jolly, yellow visual pill from a nerdy drug designer. While Books & Zines is a metazine showing, well, books and zines in different outlined shapes, the intriguing Sol (in tribute to LeWitt) shows that varying vectorially and minimally within and with the comics grid can lead to a book object that looks like the very contemporary version of an op art publication. Booklets like Labyrinthe (2014) and Compositions binaires (2015) seem to be tapped from the same vain, running somewhere between abstract comics, op art and minimalism. What makes Sol so thrilling is that the use of the risograph is reduced to its essence, leaving all fashionable fetishism behind, and producing a clear yet eye-attacking object, that detaches itself from sequential narrativity while obviously resulting from mutational variations.

    Sébastien Conard
    contributor to the Post-Comics publication

    SONDE, Volume 1, Alexis Beauclair
    13 x 19,5 cm, 448 pages, Impression Riso noir, sur papier coral book 90g, 100 exemplaires
    numérotés et signés, 2011

    Frédéric Coché


    Frédéric Coché is known primarily for his accomplished, finessed work with etching, a capacity in which he has inspired artists such as Céline Hudreaux, who has recently released a finely etched adaptation of Poe’s A Descent into the Maelström (1841) aptly called Maelstrom (2019). A French artist part of the Francophone alternative comics, graphics and art scene, Coché is intimately engaged with the Belgian Frémok, a publisher that has greatly foregrounded the impact of method and technology on storytelling also visible in Olivier Deprez’s woodcut graphic novels. Indeed, sooner than described as making graphic novels, with titles such as Hortus Sanitatis (2000), Ars simia naturae (2002), Vie et mort du héros triomphante (2005), Hic Sunt Leones (2008), La mort du roi (2014) and L’Homme Armée (2018), which is partly oil-painted employing Coché’s other favored technique, the artist is described as making etched stories. Frédéric Coché’s generally wordless etchings are marked by a narrative ellipsis that matches his formally experimental approach. The artist, who also illustrates, exposes at the Parisian Galerie la Ferronnerie.

    Charlotte Pylyser
    contributor to the Post-Comics publication

    Immersion, stratification, critique, Some aspects of the work of Sébastien Conard
    Jan Op de Beeck

    Excerpt from the post comics publication, Read full text here.

    Muriel de Crayencour


    Sculptures and sketches, cloth and iron, the Belgian artist Muriel de Crayencour is not one to shy away from different techniques or media. Ranging from the abstract to the figurative, one theme in particular that glimmers through her oeuvre, forming the red thread interweaving her works: femininity. The rhythmic sensual forms of de Crayencour’s intimately-sized bronze sculptures – joyous, almost Mattissian nudes with flowing wavy hair, tactile mammary conglomerates (the Mamounettes) – can be read as homages and continuations of Louise Bourgeois’ oeuvre. Her fabric works and embroideries evoke similar connections. De Crayencour’s expressions of the feminine provide a playful, nonchalantly subversive counterpoint to Bourgeois’ anguished, assertive forms: magenta outlines of nudes partially obscure musical scores by the likes of Jules Massenet (Partitions). Similar nudes also appear on the well-worn covers and pages of novels and self-help books; illustration (super)imposes itself on the text. In works such as Choix des élus, the sinuous outlines of a female torso are sprinkled by buttons across the pages of the eponymous book, packed in a richly embossed jacquard cover stringed to a cream glove… a feminine desacralization of the written word, a feminization of the book object? De Crayencour’s books are alive: the pages and pages of print reworked and bejeweled throb with emotion even before we begin to read them.

    Maaheen Ahmed
    contributor to the Post-Comics publication

    Non-forming post-comics, About the WREKs of Olivier Deprez
    Charlotte Pylyser

    Excerpt from the post comics publication, Read full text here.

    Un Faulduo


    Un Falduo is formed by Nicolás Daniluk (1981-), Ezequiel García (1975-), Nicolás Moguilevsky (1984-) and Nicolás Zukerfield (1982-), an “art collective exploring and experimenting around comics”, which they drift into visual and musical performances. Since their first publication, the comics take part of a metacritical work, in which they appear as interference: retraced, deformed, or minimalized in a geometric form. Their book La historieta en el (faulduo) mundo moderno (2015), derived from a performance, was turned into an exhibition: in each of those, Un Faulduo develops a sort of palimpsest over the Argentinian critics Oscar Masotta’s (1930-1979) theoretical text, recovered by drawings, staged with music. Using technics and concepts of the Situationists, they affirm that “comics are the art of copying”, and as they map their imaginary bases, they also operate in a disintegration and reintegration of comics, where ripped parts of a mural became covers of a zine, or the symbolic argentinian masterpiece El Eternauta (Oesterheld, Breccia, 1969) is decomposed in its creation tools, in its author voice.

    Maria Clara Carneiro
    contributor to the Post-Comics publication

    Amidst some paper ghosts, Jochen Gerner and the hauntology of comics
    Maria Clara da S.R. Carneiro

    Excerpt from the post comics publication, Read full text here.

    Cheerful austerity, The story-images of Tom Lambeens
    Aarnoud Rommens

    Excerpt from the post comics publication, Read full text here.

    Stefanie Leinhos


    It Will All Be Worth it in the End (2013) and Read It Out Loud (2018) by Stefanie Leinhos show every possible black-and-white variation of a single image. Some images are parts of Disney characters. That they are recognizable as Disney characters means that these images operate as a sign. However, the images here simply act as a template for the repetition and variation and do not bear any special meaning — either denotation and connotation — for being parts of Disney characters. Instead, the the reader is invited to examine the relationship between the sign and image/shape. Even when it is not working as a sign, we read the shape/image as a symbol.
    (…)
    Leinhos questions the relationship of the signifier and signified, the hierarchy of the original and reproduced, the impossibility of the representation, and the representation of time. She interrogates the critical issues of visual media, especially of the representation, through the conceptual comics.”

    Kim Jooha (2019)
    on The Comics Journal online: http://www.tcj.com/stefanie-leinhos-conceptual-comics/

    A chamber of echo
    On the post-comics of Ilan Manouach,
    Benoît Crucifix

    Excerpt from the post comics publication, Read full text here.

    Christian Marclay


    Christian Marclay is a Swiss-American visual artist and composer. Most of his work explores a distinct relationship between sound and the more material visual media such as photography, printed matter, and film. He is also known as one of the initial artists experimenting with turntables in the early seventies.

    Much like a form of physical collage, he has been using samples and records as interactive instruments often treating them to create errors, skips, and distorted loops. In his films, as well as his work with visual media he is a compiler of image fragments often using strategies related to typologies but also to loose associations and collective memory. In Marclay’s own words: ‘The restructured presentation is the commentary.’ (1)

    In the context of Post-Comics, Marclay’s project and publication To Be Continued (2) (2016) is a musical score for guitar, woodwinds, double bass, and percussion. Unlike a traditional score, the publication is staged by existing comic book cutouts of musicians and listeners. These personages and their instruments are visually rearranged to interacht with each other, and to be interpreted, page by page, by an orchestra. The graphical score is designed to be performed with the duration of 30 seconds per page. Another rule is: ‘you can imitate an instrument if it is closely related to your own.’ Analogous to what we see, the book is a script for a sound collage, and through its imagery presents us with humorous juxtapositions and twists – ones that the musicians have to improvise on. The subject of the publication, which is performed by a bunch of comic book characters, remains music and sound, but can nevertheless be enjoyed as a comic in its own right.

    In Marclay’s work there is an analogy between the sampling and cutting up of sound and the clipping and montaging of other media such as comics. The artist represented the US at the Venice Biennale in 2011, and was awarded the Golden Lion for ‘The Clock’. (3) 

    Kasper Andreasen
    artist, author, lecturer

    1   http://www.jca-online.com/marclay.html 
    2   https://www.kunstraum-innsbruck.at/publikationen/archiv/christian_marclay
    3   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0ZLrW2dmAw

    Abrasive melancholy, On Benjamin Monti
    Jean-Charles Andrieu de Levis

    Excerpt from the post comics publication, Read full text here.

    The edge of comics, Felipe Muhr’s Blindsight: excavations into comics and vision
    Maaheen Ahmed

    Excerpt from the post comics publication, Read full text here.

    Francesc Ruiz


    Francesc Ruiz makes art in an expanded comic-book format that exploits the radical potential of cheap printed matter – and words and pictures – to forge stories and to survey the construction of gay identity and the contemporary city. Ruiz advocates the work of American comic-book artist and theorist Scott McCloud as a manifesto for the future of comics. McCloud treats comics as a revolutionary device whose distributive landscape circumvents the trivializing effect and proprietary clout of mainstream media.”

    Max Andrews (2012)
    on Frieze online: https://www.frieze.com/article/focus-francesc-ruiz-0

    Robert Varlez


    Robert Varlez is a marginal author who worked in the 1970s. He disappeared from the comics production before being rediscovered in recent years thanks to the intensive promotion of the cartoonist LL de Mars and the editorial work of Alexandre Balcaen with The Hoochie Coochie editions then the Adverse editions. Although his work become famous only recently, this deficiency should not mask the extreme modernity of his work, which has lost none of its avant-garde. From his first experimental achievements on, some of which were published in the literature review Minuit, Robert Varlez established the foundations of a singular style which he continued to develop. His creations were inspired by the famous chronophotographic contact sheets produced by Eadweard Muybridge at the end of the 19th century. To analyze the locomotion of living beings, Muybridge photographed various actions by recording them over very short periods of time, so that they could be studied in the smallest anatomical details. Robert Varlez takes up this notion of photographic division of movement to which he associates a dynamic of figurative and plastic decompositions of the image. In doing so, he reproduces the pages published by Muybridge and intervenes on them by the appearance and deployment of materials and / or figures (photomontages) in the image. The bodies move, the contrasts of white and black circulate in the page and attract the sequence towards a contemplation of the figurative variations operated by these graphic fluctuations. Intervening in this way, Varlez no longer recounts a movement so much as he stages the plastic manipulations of this movement. He thus offers dreamlike and surrealist sequences where the idea of narration is abrogated in favor of the concept of visual poetry.

    The organization of a comic strip in structured boxes makes it possible to link temporally disjointed actions: the reader can imagine or project what may have taken place between two boxes. But several stases that are too close together stretch the notion of temporality at the risk of repealing it: the action no longer moves forward, the drawings become too repetitive and give the impression of standing still. Relying on this phenomenon specific to Muybridge’s boards, Robert Varlez sets up in his sequences a tension between a form of narrative disappointment (the action takes place too slowly and presents little interest in terms of the scenario) and plastic revival ( forms and masses appear, and then amend the images and divert the original movement of the image) which triggers new narrative stimuli (the action takes place on a new level). Thus, no twists and turns with Robert Varlez, or rather: twists and turns proceed essentially from visual distortions. Through this deviation from the scriptwriting efficiency of the sequence and the many graphic distortions, Varlez’s plates question the very notion of reading: the readers must switch to a contemplative mode in order to appreciate the mystery that moves them.

    Jean-Charles Andrieu de Levis
    contributor to the Post-Comics publication

    More ***posts to come
    Pauline Barzilaï
    Alexis Beauclair
    Frédéric Coché
    Sébastien Conard
    Muriel de Crayencour
    Olivier Deprez
    Un Faulduo
    Jochen Gerner
    Tom Lambeens
    Stefanie Leinhos
    Ilan Manouach
    Christian Marclay
    Benjamin Monti
    Felipe Muhr
    Francesc Ruiz
    Robert Varlez